Part III: Racism in Psychoanalytic Treatment and Supervision, Facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD

posted Feb 8, 2021, 8:46 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Study Group
Facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD
Part III: Racism in Psychoanalytic Treatment and Supervision
5 Tuesdays
March 9 - May 11, 2021
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $200
Friend Members: $225
Student Members: $100
Non-members: $250

7.5 CME/CEUs

OBJECTIVES
  1. Give an example of institutional racism that a Black psychoanalyst might have experienced.
  2. Give an example of racism that a Black psychoanalyst might have experienced from a white patient.
  3. Explain how a white clinician could misinterpret cultural trauma.
  4. Explain why a clinician and patient might collude in silence about race.
  5. Describe why racial enactments may occur.
  6. Explain what it means to view racism as a transference state.
  7. Describe how race is an adaptive challenge.
  8. Give an example of a racial dynamic in a supervisory encounter.
  9. Define what is meant by a microaggression.
  10. Explain why many people prefer the term racism to microaggression.

Schedule/Syllabus
March 9, 2021
Winograd, B. (2014). Black Psychoanalysts Speak. PEP Video Grants.

March 23, 2021
Hamer, F. (2002). Guards at the gate: Race, resistance, and psychic reality. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 50: 1219-1237.

Powell, D. (2018). Race, African Americans, and psychoanalysis: Collective silence in the therapeutic conversation. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 66: 1021-1049.

April 13, 2021
Leary, K. (2000). Racial enactments in dynamic treatment. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 10: 639-653.

Suchet, M. (2004). A relational encounter with race. Psychoanalytic Dialogues,14: 423-438.

Hamer, F. (2006). Racism as a transference state: Episodes of racial hostility in-the psychoanalytic context. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 75: 197-214.

April 27, 2021
Leary, K. (2012). Race as an adaptive challenge: Working with diversity in the clinical consulting room. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 29: 279-291.

Levy-Warren, M. (2014). A knot in the gut: Transference-countertransference and issues of race, ethnicity, and class in an adolescent treatment. Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy, 13: 133-141.

May 11, 2021
Schen, C. & Greenlee, A. (2018). Race in supervision: Let’s talk about it. Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 46: 1-21.

Tummala-Narra, P. (2004). Dynamics of race and culture in the supervisory encounter. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 21: 300-311.
Facilitator
JoAnn Ponder, PhD is a psychologist-psychoanalyst who has a private practice in Austin treating culturally and racially diverse individuals, couples, and families. She completed training in adult psychoanalysis at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston, where she currently serves on the faculty. In 2016, she put together a panel for Austin Psychoanalytic and presented a paper about the legacy of school desegregation. The program was open to the community and presented in the auditorium at a public library in historically Black east Austin. That same year, JoAnn presented a paper about racism in society and clinical practice as part of a panel at the national Division 39 Spring Meeting.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 7.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Restoring Hope for the Future: Mentalization-Based Therapy in the Treatment of Suicidal States of Mind

posted Feb 4, 2021, 8:33 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society


Evening Speaker Series
Restoring Hope for the Future:
Mentalization-Based Therapy in the Treatment of Suicidal States of Mind
Presented by Shweta Sharma, PsyD
and J. Christopher Fowler, PhD
Thursday, March 4, 2021
7:30PM – 9:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-Members: $20

CME/CEU (1.5 hrs.) Fees
Active & Student Members: Free
Friend Members: $20
Non-Members: $20

Patients who are suicidal present frightening challenges for clinicians. Many of us clinicians have or will very likely experience the devastating loss of a patient to suicide at some time in our professional lives. The effective assessment and management of suicidal states of mind is critical and complex for even the most seasoned clinician. In this presentation, we focus on the treatment of a suicidal patient using a mentalization-based approach. We believe a mentalizing approach opens-up non-suicidal pathways for enduring and dealing with emotional suffering underlying suicidal despair. We highlight the challenges and benefits of making mentalizing a core focus of therapy with a suicidal patient and reflect on its usefulness in the context of dynamic and psychoanalytic approaches to suicidal patients. We will link the suicidal breakdown to Maltsberger’s (2004) psychodynamic formulation of the suicidal crisis, articulate how a mentalizing treatment frame addresses the primary problem of the suicide crisis, and provide a clinical vignette to link theory to practice.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Identify the psychic processes in suicidal breakdown, particularly the non-mentalizing modes that predominate suicidal states of mind.
  2. Describe a mentalizing treatment frame to use as a guide to the assessment and management of suicidal states of mind.
  3. Identify the challenges and benefits of making mentalizing a core focus in therapy with patients who are suicidal.
Presenters
Shweta Sharma, Psy.D.serves as senior staff psychologist at The Menninger Clinic and as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at Baylor College of Medicine.She is also a clinical candidate in adult studies in psychoanalysis at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston, Texas. Her clinical work focuses on the assessment and treatment of suicidal young adults. Her work has been published in several peer reviewed journals including The Journal of Psychoanalytic Study of the Child and APA's Psychotherapy Journal.
J. Christopher Fowler, PhD, is the Director of Professional Wellness and a Senior Clinician at Houston Methodist Hospital’s Behavioral Health. His clinical work focuses on helping physicians and executives overcome stress-related symptoms and restore optimal functioning. As a researcher, Dr. Fowler has over 100 scientific publications in the areas of suicide, depression, neuroimaging, and treatment outcome. He is an internationally recognized personality researcher and is past editor of The Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Getting "Inside Out and Outside In" the Relational Montage of an Eating Disorder

posted Feb 2, 2021, 9:29 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Feb 2, 2021, 9:31 AM ]



Conference
Getting "Inside Out and Outside In" the Relational Montage of an Eating Disorder

Presented by Jean Petrucelli, PhD
Saturday, March 27, 2021
9:00 AM – 3:00 PM CST

4.5 CME/CE/CEUs

Conference will be held via Zoom. Login details will be sent after registration.

Registration Fees
HPS, HGPS, HEDS Members: $140
Non-members: $180
Students: $30

Co-sponsored by Houston Psychoanalytic Society, Houston Group Psychotherapy Society, and Houston Eating Disorder Specialists

Much contemporary psychodynamic/psychoanalytic thinking focuses on how to allow patients to voice threatening aspects of self and body, often not encoded in words. For those suffering from eating disorders, disavowed longings are experienced as insatiable, powerful, and dangerous, with an excess of energy and self invested in vigilantly measuring ways of living which lack spontaneity, creativity, or play. Symptoms concretize and defend against the danger inherent in any intimate exchange, which requires tolerance for uncertainty and vulnerability, beyond these patients' reach. Using clinical material, a detailed, practical exploration of how one works psychodynamically/psychoanalytically with adult ED patients beyond symptom alleviation will be explored. Understanding cultural influence, neurobiology, attachment theory, self regulation, affect regulation, self-states, body-states, and the intergenerational transmission of body image issues will be considered as it appears in individual and group treatment.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe interpersonal perspectives in the treatment of anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorders.
  2. Explain eating disordered patients' capacities to self soothe and regulate internal experience, then work more effectively with the relational component of the eating disorder as it plays out in treatment and in the world.
  3. Describe the concept of dissociation and at least one dimension of the theory related to its use in clinical work with patients with eating disorders.
  4. Explain how disordered eating is the psychic inability to care for one's self and to make better clinical use of this perspective through the contexts of attachment, self-state and body-state theory, self -regulation and affect regulation issues.
  5. Describe how to apply action-oriented techniques to enhance clinical treatment with patients with eating disorders.
Schedule/Syllabus
9:00am - 10:30am
Interpersonal Conceptualizations and Treatment of Eating Disorders While Holding the Interface of Neurobiology, Attachment, Self & Affect Regulation and Clinical Conundrums

10:30am - 10:45am COFFEE BREAK
Sponsored by Eating Recovery Center

10:45am - 12:15pm
Part 2 - Continuation and Q&A

12:15pm - 1:30pm LUNCH BREAK
Sponsored by Center for Discovery

1:30pm - 3:00pm Case Presentation, Jana Rosenbaum, LCSW, CGP, FAGPA
Q&A
Presenter
Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D. is Director and Co-Founder of the Eating Disorders, Compulsions and Addictions Service since 1995, Training & Supervising Analyst, Teaching Faculty, Conference Chair of the Conference Advisory Board (CAB), and Founding Director of the EDCAS educational certificate program at the William Alanson White Psychoanalytic Institute in NYC. She is an Adjunct Clinical Professor of Psychology at the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and is on the faculty at the Institute of Contemporary Psychology (ICP). She is an Associate Editor for the journal Contemporary Psychoanalysis, and is editor of five books, including Body-States: Interpersonal and Relational Perspectives on the Treatment of Eating Disorders (Routledge, 2015), which won the American Board and Academy of Psychoanalysis (ABAPsa) 2016 Edited Book award. Dr. Petrucelli lectures nationally and internationally and is in private practice in New York City.
Co-sponsors
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
Houston Group Psychotherapy Society
PO Box 22866
Houston, TX 77227
(713) 668-2680
Houston Eating Disorder Specialists
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 4.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HGPS follows the Texas Behavioral Health Executive Council rules for acceptable continuing education for continuing education providers. The Council oversees Texas State Board of Examiners of Marriage and Family Therapists, Texas State Board of Examiners of Licensed Professional Counselors, Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists, and Texas State Board of Social Worker Examiners. The Council no longer pre-approves or regulates continuing education providers. 

The Pilgrims’ Progress: A Therapist and Patient Journey to London

posted Jan 12, 2021, 10:31 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Feb 2, 2021, 9:30 AM ]



Evening Speaker Series
The Pilgrims’ Progress: A Therapist and Patient Journey to London
Presented by Jeffrey Stern, PhD
Thursday, February 18, 2021
7:30PM – 9:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-Members: $20

CME/CEU (1.5 hrs.) Fees
Active & Student Members: Free
Friend Members: $20
Non-Members: $20

In this advanced level presentation, I describe the treatment of a suicidally depressed middle-aged man. It was an unusual case in which I accompanied the patient to London to see a production of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials at the National Theater. The literary trilogy that was adapted for the stage had become a vital touchstone for our therapeutic work. Time permitting, I will discuss the audience members' reactions to this case when it was presented as the Keynote speech at the annual meeting of the International Association for Psychoanalytic Self Psychology in Chicago.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Provide an expanded explanation of what is meant by a therapeutic relationship, and how this contrasts with classical definitions.
  2. Compare and contrast classical and expanded meanings of boundaries in psychotherapy.
  3. Give a case example that demonstrates an expanded understanding of therapeutic creativity.

Presenter
Jeffrey Stern, PhD, is a research and clinical graduate of the Institute for Psychoanalysis, where he is a training and supervising analyst and recent past President of the Chicago Psychoanalytic Society. Dr. Stern received his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in English Literature, where his dissertation on Shakespeare's late romances won the Humanities Prize. He has been a lecturer in Psychiatry at the University of Chicago where he won the teaching award, and has also lectured at the University of Chicago in the Committee on General Studies in the Humanities. Dr. Stern is, in addition, Visiting Professor of Psychoanalysis at Wuhan University in Wuhan, China. In 2017 he was the keynote speaker at the annual meeting of the International Association for Psychoanalytic Self Psychology. He writes on self psychology, literature and film. A volume of his papers is forthcoming next year from Routledge. He maintains a private practice in Chicago and throughout the world online.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

The Death Instinct: “Remorseless Law of Nature” or Metaphor?

posted Dec 21, 2020, 6:41 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Feb 2, 2021, 9:39 AM ]


Invited Evening Lecture
The Death Instinct:
“Remorseless Law of Nature” or Metaphor?
Presented by Hannah S. Decker, PhD, Historian
Thursday, January 21, 2021
7:00PM – 9:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees (CEUs included)
Members: Free
Non-Members: $50


This presentation is a wide investigation of many topics relating to Freud’s theory that there is a powerful destructive and annihilating instinct that rivals the libido, or Eros. When Freud first proposed a death instinct on biological, psychological, and even philosophical grounds, he called it a “speculation.” But as tragedy piled on tragedy and trauma on trauma, this initial speculation hardened in his mind into an inescapable, inevitable law.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Explain why and how Sigmund Freud came to formulate his theory of a Death Instinct.
  2. Describe why and how, after rejecting it for many decades, psychoanalysts are finding the concept of a death instinct clinically and culturally useful.

Presenter
Hannah S. Decker, PhD is a history professor at the University of Houston and an honorary faculty member at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston. She earned her PhD at Columbia University and completed a fellowship in the history of psychiatry at Cornell Medical School. Her research has focused primarily on the history of Germany, psychiatry, and psychoanalysis. Dr. Decker served as consultant to the Library of Congress for an exhibit on Sigmund Freud and to PBS for a TV series on the thought of C. S. Lewis and Freud. Dr. Decker's publications include the books Freud in Germany: Revolution and Reaction in Science (1977, International Universities Press) and Freud, Dora, and Vienna 1900 (1991, Free Press). In 2014, Dr. Decker received a Special Presidential Commendation from the American Psychiatric Association for her book The Making of DSM-III: A Diagnostic Manual's Conquest of American Psychiatry (2013, Oxford University Press).
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Ethics a Deux: Problems in Cyberspace in our Digital Era, and the Ethics of Supervision, Presented by Glen Gabbard, MD

posted Dec 16, 2020, 7:57 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Dec 16, 2020, 8:09 AM ]

Conference
Ethics a Deux: Problems in Cyberspace in Our Digital Era, and the Ethics of Supervision

Presented by Glen Gabbard, MD
Saturday, February 6, 2021
9:00 AM – 12:15 PM CST

3 CME/CEUs

Zoom Conference
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $75
Friend Members: $90
Student Members: $40
Non-members: $100

Dr. Gabbard will address two areas of ethics for mental health professionals. He will first discuss the complications of the digital era in the practice of psychotherapy and then he will outline common problems in the provision of supervision to psychotherapists.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Explain the legal and ethical complications of communicating with patients via texting, email, and social media.
  2. State guidelines on googling one's patients.
  3. Describe common ethical problems confronted in psychotherapy supervision. 
Presenter
Dr. Glen Gabbard is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and Training and Supervising Analyst in the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston. He is also in private practice in Houston. Dr. Gabbard has authored or edited 27 books, including Psychodynamic Psychiatry in Clinical Practice: 5th edition, an all-time best seller at American Psychiatric Publishing, Long-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: a Basic Text: 2nd edition, Gabbard’s Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, Psychiatry and the Cinema, and The Psychology of The Sopranos. He has also published over 350 scientific papers and book chapters. Previous positions include Brown Foundation Chair of Psychoanalysis and Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine from 2001-2011 and Director of the Menninger Hospital in Topeka, Kansas from 1989-1994. He has received many honors and awards, including the American Psychiatric Association/NIMH Vestermark Award for Psychiatric Education in 2010 and the prestigious Mary Sigourney Award of the American Psychoanalytic Association in 2000 for outstanding contributions to psychoanalysis. He was Joint Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis from 2001- 2007, the first non-British analyst to hold that position, and served as President of the American College of Psychiatrists from 2006- 2007. Dr. Gabbard’s textbooks have been translated into Italian, French, German, Portuguese, Korean, Japanese, Danish, Chinese, Greek, Romanian, and Spanish. He lectures throughout Europe, South America, and Australia, as well as the United States and Canada.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.



Across Racial Lines: Avoiding the Unspoken Truth in the Clinical Consulting Room

posted Dec 10, 2020, 2:25 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Dec 16, 2020, 8:11 AM ]

Evening Speaker Series
Across Racial Lines:
Avoiding the Unspoken Truth in the Clinical Consulting Room
Presented by Felecia Powell-Williams, EdD, LPC, RPT-S
Thursday, January 7, 2021
7:30PM – 9:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-Members: $20

CME/CEU (1.5 hrs.) Fees
Active & Student Members: Free
Friend Members: $20
Non-Members: $20

The current iteration of the civil rights movement again reminds us of longstanding racial biases and systemic racism in this country. These issues surface not only in our communities, but also in our clinical consulting rooms. This beginning to advanced-level presentation will examine the threads of race and diversity in the psychoanalytic encounter, especially when the clinician and patient have different racial identities. While racial biases occasionally surface directly in the form of microaggressions, the biases more often appear in disguised form, if spoken at all. These unacknowledged or even unconscious attitudes are ripe for reenactments. Clinical illustrations will show how they affect the most basic components of fantasy, associations, transference, and countertransference in the psychoanalytic process. 

OBJECTIVES
  1. Identify how race and diversity are introduced into the consulting room.
  2. Identify two major dynamics that may lead to resistance in exploring race and diversity in the clinical setting.

PRESENTER
Dr. Felecia Powell-Williams, is a Licensed Professional Counselor –Supervisor. She completed her doctorate degree in Clinical Counseling. In addition, Dr. Powell-Williams is a Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychoanalyst at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston, Texas, where she also holds the positions of President of Board of Directors and faculty member in the Child and Adult Training Programs. Felecia provides clinical supervision for the State of Texas licensing board, as well as supervision as a Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor with the Association for Play Therapy. Along with maintaining a private practice, Felecia teaches on a collegiate level, and provides clinical consultation and professional training with many local, state and national organizations on recognizing the need of mental health services for children, adolescents, adults, and families.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Part II: African-American Trauma and the Legacy of Slavery

posted Dec 1, 2020, 11:23 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Dec 16, 2020, 8:12 AM ]

Study Group
Facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD
African-American Trauma and the Legacy of Slavery
3 Tuesdays
January 12 - February 9, 2021
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $120
Friend Members: $135
Student Members: $60
Non-members: $150

4.5 CME/CEUs

The Black Lives Matter movement has again drawn national attention to African Americans subjected to violence by white perpetrators, vigilantes, and police officers. While the current sociopolitical climate has fueled the divisiveness in the U.S., racism has been present since the time of slavery, with unconscious attitudes, conscious biases, and systemic social contributions. This study group will explore these issues in the community and treatment settings. The group will consider 2 contemporary bestsellers, The New Jim Crow and White Fragility; the documentary film Black Psychoanalysts Speak; and a variety of psychoanalytic journal articles that examine racism and its roots. The study group will consist of 3 parts: Part I about white privilege and fragility, as well as the dynamics of prejudice and racism; Part II about the legacy of slavery and African-American trauma; and Part III about how these issues may unfold in psychoanalytic treatment and supervision. Separate registration is required for each Part of the series, and enrollment is limited. Journal articles will be emailed to participants.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe 2 ways that white parents resisted school desegregation.
  2. Describe some social trends and institutional responses that have contributed to the mass incarceration of Black people.
  3. Describe how slavery continues to traumatize African American people.
  4. Define the term “discriminatory gesture.”
  5. Explain why psychoanalysis was slow to recognize the effects of racism.

Schedule/Syllabus
January 12, 2021
Alexander, M. (2010). The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New York: New Press.

January 26, 2021
White, K. (2002). Surviving hating and being hated: Some personal thoughts about racism from a psychoanalytic perspective. Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 38: 401-422.

Hart, A. (2019). The discriminatory gesture: A psychoanalytic consideration of posttraumatic reactions to incidents of racial discrimination. Psychoanalytic Social Work, 26: 5-24.

February 9, 2021
Gump, J. (2010). Reality matters: The shadow of trauma on African American subjectivity. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 27: 42-54.

Holmes, D. (2016). Culturally imposed trauma: The sleeping dog has awakened. Will psychoanalysis take heed? Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 26: 641-654.
Facilitator
JoAnn Ponder, PhD is a psychologist-psychoanalyst who has a private practice in Austin treating culturally and racially diverse individuals, couples, and families. She completed training in adult psychoanalysis at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston, where she currently serves on the faculty. In 2016, she put together a panel for Austin Psychoanalytic and presented a paper about the legacy of school desegregation. The program was open to the community and presented in the auditorium at a public library in historically Black east Austin. That same year, JoAnn presented a paper about racism in society and clinical practice as part of a panel at the national Division 39 Spring Meeting.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 4.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Searching for Self and Connection: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Understanding and Treating Eating Disorders

posted Dec 1, 2020, 11:17 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Dec 2, 2020, 10:00 AM ]

Study Group
Searching for Self and Connection: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Understanding and Treating Eating Disorders
Facilitated by Karen R. Strupp, PhD
5 Wednesdays
January 6 - March 3, 2021
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $200
Friend Members: $225
Student Members: $100
Non-members: $250

7.5 CME/CEUs

When treating clients with an eating disorder, psychotherapists are faced with perplexing and high-stakes challenges, given that the disorder can result in serious health impairments and even death. According to one expert in the field, Jean Petrucelli, PhD, eating disorders are disorders of self and mutual regulation. Treatment invariably involves a complex negotiation between directly intervening in the symptom while simultaneously backing away from the pull to do so. Petrucelli has stated that a major goal of treatment is understanding what role the symptom plays in the client’s inner and interpersonal world. This study group is intermediate-level, intended for psychotherapists who have some knowledge about psychoanalytic theory and treatment, but who want to learn more about eating disorders. We will explore the etiologies, underlying dynamics, and psychoanalytic treatment considerations for eating disorders. The group is open to those who plan to attend the HPS conference presented by Petrucelli, as well as those who do not plan to do so. We will utilize readings by various authors, along with lecture and discussion. Registration is limited to a small enough group of participants to allow time for them to share and explore their own case material. Participants should obtain a copy of the textbook edited by Petrucelli in 2014, Body-States: Interpersonal and Relational Perspectives on the Treatment of Eating Disorders.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe 3 types of regulation deficits seen in clients with eating disorders.
  2. Explain how anorexia can involve unconscious defenses against maturity.
  3. Explain how hormones might relate to the onset of an eating disorder.
  4. Describe 2 body image problems seen in eating disorders.
  5. Describe the role of culture in the development and reinforcement of eating disorders.
  6. Describe the major family dynamics seen in clients with eating disorders.
  7. Explain how emotions can foster the movement from a compulsion to a choice.
  8. Describe the major dynamics seen in binge eating.
  9. Describe the possible indications for medication to help treat a client with an eating disorder.
  10. Describe the intergenerational transmission of embodiment and eating disorder.

Schedule/Syllabus
January 6, 2021
Body-States, Part I

January 20, 2021
Body-States, Part II

February 3, 2021
Body-States, Part III

February 17, 2021
Body-States, Part IV

March 3, 2021
Body-States, Part V
Facilitator
Karen R. Strupp, PhD is a clinical psychologist and adult and child psychoanalyst in private practice in Houston. She is a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst on the faculty of the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies and a clinical adjunct professor in Baylor College of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Strupp co-authored a paper in 1988 on Sensory Integration of Body Image Distortion in Eating Disorder Patients and has taught and presented on treatment of eating disorders at high schools, at Baylor College of Medicine in the departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Adolescent Medicine, and on local radio and television. 
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 7.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Psychology and Soul: The Intersection of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and the Religious Patient presented by Presented by Holly Crisp-Han, MD and Rev. Greg Han

posted Oct 6, 2020, 9:02 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Evening Speaker Series
Psychology and Soul: The Intersection of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and the Religious Patient
Presented by Holly Crisp-Han, MD and Rev. Greg Han
Thursday, November 5, 2020
7:30PM – 9:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation
Registration Deadline: November 3, 2020

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-Members: $20

CME/CEU (1.5 hrs) Fees
Active & Student Members: Free
Friend Members: $20
Non-Members: $20

This presentation will address issues that may arise when working in a psychoanalytic/psychodynamic course of treatment with someone who is religious. The relationship between the religious and the psychological can be one that can be a productive and rich source of exploration in a therapeutic process, and can also create complexities that are challenging for the clinician to unravel. This seminar will explore the relationship between these two dynamics and how their relationship can be mediated within the psychodynamic process.

Rev. Han will address how religiously devout patients from a variety of religious backgrounds will bring ideas of faith as a key source of meaning in their lives. While their understanding of faith can be liberating, it can also be the source of conflict and an aspect of what brings the patient to psychodynamic treatment. While treating the religious impulse as sui generis, he will also assess religion as an intersection of multiple facets of the patient’s understanding of self. In all, the religious impulse of meaning and being connected with that which is both beyond the patient yet also within the patient needs to be approached with care, even reverence. Dr. Crisp will explore some of the complex challenges in working with patients in a psychodynamic therapeutic context regarding their religious and spiritual lives. She will look at how their faith gives both a sense of meaning and purpose, and may also contribute to conflicts within the self around beliefs or within the family/faith community. Furthermore, she will explore the dynamics of transference and countertransference that may unfold in these therapeutic dyads. She will explore challenging questions of self-disclosure when patients are curious about the therapist’s religious beliefs. The seminar will also provide time for the participants to engage in discussion with the presenters regarding their own clinical dilemmas and questions regarding these matters.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe the complexity of the interactions between religious/spiritual and psychological dynamics in the psychotherapeutic encounter.
  2. Describe how the patients’ religious and faith backgrounds can provide key sources of meaning as well as conflicts from a dynamic perspective.
  3. Explain how to apply concepts of transference and countertransference to working with therapy patients around issues of religion and faith.

Presenters
Since 1998, the Rev. Gregory Han has worked at the intersection of religion, education, and dialogue. After a year as a hospital chaplain, he served Presbyterian congregations for eight years. He then taught courses in the study of religion and ethics, as well as literature and writing for six years at the high school level, and he has also taught at the university level in the Honors College at the University of Houston. Since summer 2014, he has served as the Director of Interfaith Relations & Education at Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston, where he works to build understanding and relationships across diverse faith traditions in one of America’s most diverse urban regions. He speaks and teaches regularly on religions of the world and interfaith dialogue. He holds degrees from Georgetown University and Harvard Divinity School.
Holly Crisp, MD is in the private practice of psychoanalysis and psychiatry in Houston. She is on the faculty of the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies and is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine. She co-authored the 2018 book with Glen O. Gabbard, Narcissism and its Discontents: Diagnostic Dilemmas and Treatment Strategies in Narcissistic Patients. She previously co-authored Professionalism in Psychiatry and has also written papers on narcissism, the education of psychiatric residents, development of psychotherapeutic and psychoanalytic identity, teaching boundaries and ethics, as well as boundary violations and mentalizing in the clergy. She teaches psychodynamic psychotherapy in the Baylor residency program and courses at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston. 
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

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