Part II: African-American Trauma and the Legacy of Slavery

posted Dec 1, 2020, 11:23 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated ]

Study Group
Facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD
Part II: African-American Trauma and the Legacy of Slavery
3 Tuesdays
January 12 - February 9, 2021
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $120
Friend Members: $135
Student Members: $60
Non-members: $150

4.5 CME/CEUs

The Black Lives Matter movement has again drawn national attention to African Americans subjected to violence by white perpetrators, vigilantes, and police officers. While the current sociopolitical climate has fueled the divisiveness in the U.S., racism has been present since the time of slavery, with unconscious attitudes, conscious biases, and systemic social contributions. This study group will explore these issues in the community and treatment settings. The group will consider 2 contemporary bestsellers, The New Jim Crow and White Fragility; the documentary film Black Psychoanalysts Speak; and a variety of psychoanalytic journal articles that examine racism and its roots. The study group will consist of 3 parts: Part I about white privilege and fragility, as well as the dynamics of prejudice and racism; Part II about the legacy of slavery and African-American trauma; and Part III about how these issues may unfold in psychoanalytic treatment and supervision. Separate registration is required for each Part of the series, and enrollment is limited. Journal articles will be emailed to participants.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe 2 ways that white parents resisted school desegregation.
  2. Describe some social trends and institutional responses that have contributed to the mass incarceration of Black people.
  3. Describe how slavery continues to traumatize African American people.
  4. Define the term “discriminatory gesture.”
  5. Explain why psychoanalysis was slow to recognize the effects of racism.

Schedule/Syllabus
January 12, 2021
Alexander, M. (2010). The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New York: New Press.

January 26, 2021
White, K. (2002). Surviving hating and being hated: Some personal thoughts about racism from a psychoanalytic perspective. Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 38: 401-422.

Hart, A. (2019). The discriminatory gesture: A psychoanalytic consideration of posttraumatic reactions to incidents of racial discrimination. Psychoanalytic Social Work, 26: 5-24.

February 9, 2021
Gump, J. (2010). Reality matters: The shadow of trauma on African American subjectivity. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 27: 42-54.

Holmes, D. (2016). Culturally imposed trauma: The sleeping dog has awakened. Will psychoanalysis take heed? Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 26: 641-654.
Facilitator
JoAnn Ponder, PhD is a psychologist-psychoanalyst who has a private practice in Austin treating culturally and racially diverse individuals, couples, and families. She completed training in adult psychoanalysis at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston, where she currently serves on the faculty. In 2016, she put together a panel for Austin Psychoanalytic and presented a paper about the legacy of school desegregation. The program was open to the community and presented in the auditorium at a public library in historically Black east Austin. That same year, JoAnn presented a paper about racism in society and clinical practice as part of a panel at the national Division 39 Spring Meeting.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 4.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Searching for Self and Connection: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Understanding and Treating Eating Disorders

posted Dec 1, 2020, 11:17 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated ]

Study Group
Searching for Self and Connection: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Understanding and Treating Eating Disorders
Facilitated by Karen R. Strupp, PhD
5 Wednesdays
January 6 - March 3, 2021
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $200
Friend Members: $225
Student Members: $100
Non-members: $250

7.5 CME/CEUs

When treating clients with an eating disorder, psychotherapists are faced with perplexing and high-stakes challenges, given that the disorder can result in serious health impairments and even death. According to one expert in the field, Jean Petrucelli, PhD, eating disorders are disorders of self and mutual regulation. Treatment invariably involves a complex negotiation between directly intervening in the symptom while simultaneously backing away from the pull to do so. Petrucelli has stated that a major goal of treatment is understanding what role the symptom plays in the client’s inner and interpersonal world. This study group is intermediate-level, intended for psychotherapists who have some knowledge about psychoanalytic theory and treatment, but who want to learn more about eating disorders. We will explore the etiologies, underlying dynamics, and psychoanalytic treatment considerations for eating disorders. The group is open to those who plan to attend the HPS conference presented by Petrucelli, as well as those who do not plan to do so. We will utilize readings by various authors, along with lecture and discussion. Registration is limited to a small enough group of participants to allow time for them to share and explore their own case material. Participants should obtain a copy of the textbook edited by Petrucelli in 2014, Body-States: Interpersonal and Relational Perspectives on the Treatment of Eating Disorders.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe 3 types of regulation deficits seen in clients with eating disorders.
  2. Explain how anorexia can involve unconscious defenses against maturity.
  3. Explain how hormones might relate to the onset of an eating disorder.
  4. Describe 2 body image problems seen in eating disorders.
  5. Describe the role of culture in the development and reinforcement of eating disorders.
  6. Describe the major family dynamics seen in clients with eating disorders.
  7. Explain how emotions can foster the movement from a compulsion to a choice.
  8. Describe the major dynamics seen in binge eating.
  9. Describe the possible indications for medication to help treat a client with an eating disorder.
  10. Describe the intergenerational transmission of embodiment and eating disorder.

Schedule/Syllabus
January 6, 2021
Body-States, Part I

January 20, 2021
Body-States, Part II

February 3, 2021
Body-States, Part III

February 17, 2021
Body-States, Part IV

March 3, 2021
Body-States, Part V
Facilitator
Karen R. Strupp, PhD is a clinical psychologist and adult and child psychoanalyst in private practice in Houston. She is a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst on the faculty of the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies and a clinical adjunct professor in Baylor College of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Strupp co-authored a paper in 1988 on Sensory Integration of Body Image Distortion in Eating Disorder Patients and has taught and presented on treatment of eating disorders at high schools, at Baylor College of Medicine in the departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Adolescent Medicine, and on local radio and television. 
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 7.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Psychology and Soul: The Intersection of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and the Religious Patient presented by Presented by Holly Crisp-Han, MD and Rev. Greg Han

posted Oct 6, 2020, 9:02 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Evening Speaker Series
Psychology and Soul: The Intersection of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and the Religious Patient
Presented by Holly Crisp-Han, MD and Rev. Greg Han
Thursday, November 5, 2020
7:30PM – 9:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation
Registration Deadline: November 3, 2020

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-Members: $20

CME/CEU (1.5 hrs) Fees
Active & Student Members: Free
Friend Members: $20
Non-Members: $20

This presentation will address issues that may arise when working in a psychoanalytic/psychodynamic course of treatment with someone who is religious. The relationship between the religious and the psychological can be one that can be a productive and rich source of exploration in a therapeutic process, and can also create complexities that are challenging for the clinician to unravel. This seminar will explore the relationship between these two dynamics and how their relationship can be mediated within the psychodynamic process.

Rev. Han will address how religiously devout patients from a variety of religious backgrounds will bring ideas of faith as a key source of meaning in their lives. While their understanding of faith can be liberating, it can also be the source of conflict and an aspect of what brings the patient to psychodynamic treatment. While treating the religious impulse as sui generis, he will also assess religion as an intersection of multiple facets of the patient’s understanding of self. In all, the religious impulse of meaning and being connected with that which is both beyond the patient yet also within the patient needs to be approached with care, even reverence. Dr. Crisp will explore some of the complex challenges in working with patients in a psychodynamic therapeutic context regarding their religious and spiritual lives. She will look at how their faith gives both a sense of meaning and purpose, and may also contribute to conflicts within the self around beliefs or within the family/faith community. Furthermore, she will explore the dynamics of transference and countertransference that may unfold in these therapeutic dyads. She will explore challenging questions of self-disclosure when patients are curious about the therapist’s religious beliefs. The seminar will also provide time for the participants to engage in discussion with the presenters regarding their own clinical dilemmas and questions regarding these matters.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe the complexity of the interactions between religious/spiritual and psychological dynamics in the psychotherapeutic encounter.
  2. Describe how the patients’ religious and faith backgrounds can provide key sources of meaning as well as conflicts from a dynamic perspective.
  3. Explain how to apply concepts of transference and countertransference to working with therapy patients around issues of religion and faith.

Presenters
Since 1998, the Rev. Gregory Han has worked at the intersection of religion, education, and dialogue. After a year as a hospital chaplain, he served Presbyterian congregations for eight years. He then taught courses in the study of religion and ethics, as well as literature and writing for six years at the high school level, and he has also taught at the university level in the Honors College at the University of Houston. Since summer 2014, he has served as the Director of Interfaith Relations & Education at Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston, where he works to build understanding and relationships across diverse faith traditions in one of America’s most diverse urban regions. He speaks and teaches regularly on religions of the world and interfaith dialogue. He holds degrees from Georgetown University and Harvard Divinity School.
Holly Crisp, MD is in the private practice of psychoanalysis and psychiatry in Houston. She is on the faculty of the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies and is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine. She co-authored the 2018 book with Glen O. Gabbard, Narcissism and its Discontents: Diagnostic Dilemmas and Treatment Strategies in Narcissistic Patients. She previously co-authored Professionalism in Psychiatry and has also written papers on narcissism, the education of psychiatric residents, development of psychotherapeutic and psychoanalytic identity, teaching boundaries and ethics, as well as boundary violations and mentalizing in the clergy. She teaches psychodynamic psychotherapy in the Baylor residency program and courses at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston. 
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Contemporary Self Psychology: Concepts and Treatment of High Level Disorders, presented by Richard Geist, EdD

posted Sep 15, 2020, 7:01 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Sep 15, 2020, 7:19 AM ]

Conference

Contemporary Self Psychology: Concepts and Treatment of High Level Disorders

Presented by Richard Geist, EdD
Saturday, October 17, 2020
9:00 AM – 12:15 PM CDT

3 CME/CEUs

Zoom Conference
Details to follow upon registration

Registration Fees
Active Members: $65
Friend Members: $75
Student Members: $30
Non-members: $85

This workshop will use verbatim clinical dialogue to illustrate the differences between more traditional psychoanalytic treatment and self psychological treatment. We will begin with dialogue from a patient seen pre and post my self psychological orientation to illustrate some major self psychological concepts. Then we will proceed to dialogue illustrating how self psychology deals with Oedipal material and interpretive work with high level patients. Throughout this clinically oriented workshop we will emphasize the impact of the therapist on the treatment process. 

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe what is meant by empathy in self psychology.
  2. Explain the self psychological meaning of interpretation.
  3. List three well known self psychological transferences.
  4. Define what we mean by permeable boundaries.

Presenter
Richard Geist received his undergraduate degree and his doctorate in Psychology from Harvard University and for 30 years was Clinical Instructor, Department of Psychiatry (Psychology), Harvard Medical School. He is a Founding Member, Faculty, Supervising analyst, and former member of the Board of Directors of The Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis. In addition Dick has been on the Executive Board of the International Association for Psychoanalytic Self Psychology and is currently a council member. Dr. Geist was one of the first psychologists in Boston to embrace Self Psychology theory and practice, and he has been teaching and supervising it for over 35 years. He has written numerous papers on clinical self psychology, including papers on how empathy heals, re-conceptualizing the oedipal complex, boundaries in treatment, eating disorders, the forward edge, and several papers on connectedness between analyst and patient. He has been a senior supervising psychologist at Children’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Dick maintains a private practice in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy in Newton, Massachusetts where he sees children, adolescents, adults, and couples. He also supervises privately, teaches private self psychology seminars and directs a self psychology study group.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Low Sexual Desire: What Do You Do When You Don't Want to Do It? Presented by Penelope Frohlich, PhD

posted Sep 12, 2020, 4:31 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Evening Speaker Series
Low Sexual Desire: What Do You Do When You Don't Want to Do It?
Presented by Penelope Frohlich, PhD
Thursday, October 1, 2020
7:30PM – 9:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-Members: $20

CME/CEU (1.5 hrs.) Fees
Active & Student Members: Free
Friend Members: $20
Non-Members: $20

Low or absent sexual desire is diagnostically and therapeutically challenging. A variety of issues can lead to low libido and even if you have correctly diagnosed the core problem it can be tenaciously resistant to treatment. This is in sharp contrast to other sexual symptoms such as erectile dysfunction or sexual pain that frequently are successfully alleviated by medical treatment and/or short term psychological treatment models. In clients with low libido the core issue may be fairly clear, but more often the core problem is complex and difficult to identify and the whole of the intrapsychic and interpersonal dynamics must be considered to help the client achieve his or her therapeutic goals. Several cases will be presented and discussed to illustrate this richly diverse group.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Attendees will be able to differentiate between asexuality, sexual aversion, and low or absent sexual desire, and will be able to differentiate between different types and degrees of low desire.
  2. Attendees will be able to identify a variety of issues that can lead to low or absent sexual desire.
  3. Attendees will be able to identify treatment interventions most likely to increase libido and sexual pleasure.

Presenter
Penny Frohlich received her Ph.D in clinical psychology at the University of Texas at Austin Sexual Psychophysiology Laboratory. She interned at the Audie L. Murphy Veterans Hospital in San Antonio where she counseled male and female veterans with depression, anxiety, spinal cord injuries, sexual and combat-related post traumatic stress disorder, and sexual dysfunction. She worked as a Lecturer and Adjunct Professor of Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin and Concordia University at Austin, and has published eight peer reviewed articles and chapters on sexuality. She received post-doctoral training in psychoanalytic theory, marriage and family therapy, and somatic experiencing theories and techniques. She has been practicing in the Austin area since 2005 where she offers individual and couples therapy to adult clients.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Introduction to Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Facilitated by Connie Ittner, LCSW, CGP

posted Sep 3, 2020, 7:31 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Oct 8, 2020, 10:53 AM ]


Study Group
Introduction to Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
Facilitated by Connie Ittner, LCSW, CGP
6 Wednesdays
Oct. 28, Nov. 4 - 18, Dec. 2 - 9, 2020
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation
Registration deadline: October 26, 2020

Registration Fees
Active Members: $240
Friend Members: $270
Student Members: $120
Non-members: $300

9 CME/CEUs
This basic-level study group will utilize readings, lecture, and discussion to help participants learn about psychoanalytic psychotherapy. We will explore the underlying theoretical concepts that distinguish a psychoanalytic therapy from other forms of therapy, including theories about what motivates human behavior and how change occurs. We will explore technical aspects of treatment, from setting the therapeutic frame to terminating the treatment. The group is open to clinicians, but no prior experience in psychoanalytic therapy is required. Registration is limited in order to allow time for participants to share and explore their own case material with the group. Participants should obtain a copy of the following textbook: Gabbard, G. (2017). Long-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Basic Text. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing.

OBJECTIVES
  1. List 3 elements of the treatment frame.
  2. Define therapeutic abstinence, anonymity, and neutrality.
  3. Explain why therapists should avoid self-disclosure.
  4. Write a dynamic formulation.
  5. Define and give an example of transference.
  6. Define and give an example of countertransference.
  7. Define and give examples of 4 psychological defenses.
  8. Describe some steps in making an effective interpretation.
  9. Describe 2 ways in which unconscious issues might start to surface.
  10. Give an example of a dream interpretation.
  11. Explain the goals of termination.

Schedule/Syllabus
October 28, 2020
Chapter 1

November 4, 2020
Chapter 2

November 11, 2020
Chapters 3-4
November 18, 2021
Chapters 5-6

December 2, 2020
Chapter 7

December 9, 2020
Chapters 8-9
Facilitator
Connie Ittner, LCSW, CGP is a 2009 University of Texas at Austin graduate who received her Masters degree in Clinical Social Work from The University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work in 2013. Connie's graduate-level internship training at The Council on Recovery in 2012 was largely focused on psychodynamically-informed psychotherapy. In 2014, Connie completed a year-long post-graduate Clinical Social Work Fellowship on the Professionals in Crisis Unit at The Menninger Clinic where she received further dynamically-informed education, training and experience working with adults suffering from a variety of psychiatric symptoms and life circumstances. She received a certificate from the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies for completion of Studies in Adult Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in 2017 and has served in the past on its Admissions Committee. Most recently she has served the Houston Psychoanalytic Society on its Board as Membership Chair in 2017. Connie is currently in private practice in the Heights.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 9 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Empathy, Connectedness, and the Development of Self, Facilitated by Linda Chase, LCSW, CGP

posted Sep 3, 2020, 7:31 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Study Group
Empathy, Connectedness, and the Development of Self
Facilitated by Linda Chase, LCSW, CGP
4 Tuesdays
September 15th - October 6th, 2020
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $160
Friend Members: $180
Student Members: $80
Non-members: $200

6 CME/CEUs

Self psychology represents a dramatic shift from classical psychoanalytic theories and techniques, and the Freudian view of human nature on which they were based. Kohut’s contrasting world view is premised on beliefs in protecting the client, learning from the client, and building on health rather than curing pathology. It is inherent in Kohut’s empathic listening perspective that connectedness is the unarticulated process upon which self-structure develops. This intermediate to advanced-level study group is intended for psychotherapists who have a basic knowledge about self psychology theory and interventions, but want to learn more. We will consider how concepts such as the unconscious and treatment alliance are viewed in self psychology. We will explore clinical interchanges that illustrate the value of permeable boundaries in connectedness between client and therapist, along with the process in analyzing the forward edge of the transference, which obviates the need to address the trailing edge. The group will utilize readings by Richard Geist, EdD, along with lecture and discussion. The group is open to those who plan to attend the HPS conference presented by Geist, as well as those who do not plan to do so. Registration is limited to a small enough group of participants to allow time for them to share and explore their own case material. Readings will be emailed to participants.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Compare a Kohutian view of human nature to a Freudian view.
  2. Describe 3 ways in which self psychology practices differ from those in classical psychoanalysis.
  3. Explain why empathy is considered the instrument of change in self psychology.
  4. Define selfobject transference.
  5. Give an example of selfobject transference.
  6. Explain what is meant by a transmuting internalization.
  7. Define connectedness.
  8. Describe the value of permeable boundaries in client-therapist connectedness.
  9. Distinguish the forward edge of transference from the trailing edge.
  10. Describe 2 mechanisms in analyzing the forward edge of transference.
Schedule/Syllabus
September 15, 2020
Geist, R. (2008). Connectedness, Permeable Boundaries, and the Development of the Self: Therapeutic Implications. International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology, 3: 129-152. DOI: 10.1080/15551020801922971 

September 22, 2020
Geist, R. (2011). The Forward Edge, Connectedness, and the Therapeutic Process. International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology, 6: 235-251. DOI: 10.1080/15551024.2011.552178

September 29, 2020
Geist, R. (2015). Conversations with Paul. International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology, 10: 91-106.
DOI: 10.1080/15551024.2015.1005795

October 6, 2020
Geist, R. (in press). From theory centered to patient centered treatment: How Kohut’s attitudes impact contemporary therapeutic work. Psychoanalytic Inquiry.
Facilitator
A Few Words from Linda Chase, LCSW, CGP: I have been utilizing a Self Psychology perspective in my private practice in Houston for over 20 years working with individuals, couples and groups. My gravitation toward Self Psychology began when I was a Fellow in the Studies in Adult Psychodynamic Psychotherapy at CFPS from 1998 to 2000. I very much resonated with the concepts of empathy (vicarious introspection), experience-near connectedness between therapist and client, disruption-repair process and reactivation of self development; both professionally and in my own personal therapeutic journey. I experienced the therapeutic and developmental growth fostered in a Self Psychology Group when I participated in a 2-day Self Psychology training group at an annual conference sponsored by the American Group Psychotherapy Association. This growth-oriented Group experience prompted me to further utilize a Self Psychological perspective in my private practice groups and to facilitate Self Psychology training groups at the Houston Group Psychotherapy Society’s annual Institutes. Most recently, I joined the International Association for Psychoanalytic Self Psychology (IAPSP). Attending the International conferences in Vienna and Vancouver, deepened and broadened my understanding of the multi-cultural applications of Self Psychology. I look forward to sharing my Self Psychology journey with those who are curious and/or interested in this Study Group.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 6 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

White Privilege, White Fragility and the Transmission of Racism, Facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD

posted Sep 3, 2020, 7:30 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Study Group
Facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD
Part I: White Privilege, White Fragility and the Transmission of Racism
4 Tuesdays
October 13 - December 1, 2020
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $160
Friend Members: $180
Student Members: $80
Non-members: $200

6 CME/CEUs

The Black Lives Matter movement has again drawn national attention to African Americans subjected to violence by white perpetrators, vigilantes, and police officers. While the current sociopolitical climate has fueled the divisiveness in the U.S., racism has been present since the time of slavery, with unconscious attitudes, conscious biases, and systemic social contributions. This study group will explore these issues in the community and treatment settings. The group will consider 2 contemporary bestsellers, The New Jim Crow and White Fragility; the documentary film Black Psychoanalysts Speak; and a variety of psychoanalytic journal articles that examine racism and its roots. The study group will consist of 3 parts: Part I about White privilege and fragility, as well as the dynamics of prejudice and racism; Part II about the legacy of slavery and African-American trauma; and Part III about how these issues may unfold in psychoanalytic treatment and supervision. Separate registration is required for each Part of the series, and enrollment is limited. Journal articles will be emailed to participants.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Define White privilege.
  2. Give an example of White privilege.
  3. Define White fragility.
  4. Give an example of White fragility.
  5. Explain how White people view whiteness.
  6. Describe how slavery is imbedded in the collective unconscious of White people.
  7. Describe the social and intrapsychic transmission of racism.
  8. Identify 2 psychological processes in the intergenerational transmission of racist attitudes.
Schedule/Syllabus
October 13, 2020
DiAngelo, R. (2018). White Fragility: Why it’s so Hard for White People to Talk About-----Racism. Boston: Beacon.

November 3, 2020
Parker, R. (2019). Slavery in the White psyche. Psychoanalytic Social Work, 26: 84-103.
Altman, N. (2006). Whiteness. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 75: 45-72. 
   
November 17, 2020
Straker, G. (2004). Race for cover: Castrated whiteness, perverse consequences. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 14: 405-422.

Layton, L. (2006). Racial identities, racial enactments, and normative unconscious processes. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 75: 237-269.

December 1, 2020
Moss, D. (2001). On hating in the first person plural: Thinking psychoanalytically about racism, homophobia, and misogyny. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 49: 1315-1334.

Dalal, F. (2006). Racism: Processes of detachment, dehumanization, and hatred. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 75: 131-161.

Facilitator
JoAnn Ponder, PhD is a psychologist-psychoanalyst who has a private practice in Austin treating culturally and racially diverse individuals, couples, and families. She completed training in adult psychoanalysis at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston, where she currently serves on the faculty. In 2016, she put together a panel for Austin Psychoanalytic and presented a paper about the legacy of school desegregation. The program was open to the community and presented in the auditorium at a public library in historically Black east Austin. That same year, JoAnn presented a paper about racism in society and clinical practice as part of a panel at the national Division 39 Spring Meeting.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 6 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Intervention Strategies for Addressing Collective Trauma: Healing Communities Ravaged by Racial Strife, Presented by Ricardo Ainslie, PhD

posted Sep 2, 2020, 1:36 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Evening Speaker Series
Intervention Strategies for Addressing Collective Trauma: Healing Communities Ravaged by Racial Strife
Presented by Ricardo Ainslie, PhD
Thursday, September 10, 2020
7:30PM – 9:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation
Registration Deadline: September 7, 2020

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-Members: $20

CME/CEU (1.5 hrs.) Fees
Active & Student Members: Free
Friend Members: $20
Non-Members: $20

This intermediate-level presentation describes an ethnographic research project and three interrelated, psychoanalytically informed interventions conducted in Hempstead, Texas, where conflict-laden residues of the Jim Crow era had continued to affect race relations. The project drew from psychoanalytic notions of the relation between trauma and memory, as well as the importance of “giving voice” and representation as essential elements of a healing process for both individual and collective traumatic experience.

The first intervention (the creation of a space within which Jim Crow– and Civil Rights–era narratives could be spoken and explored) and the second intervention (the creation of a documentary film) were closely linked because they were part of a process in which interviews gave testimony about a decisive, transformational experience. The third intervention created a public event where that which had been denied and excommunicated from the dominant narrative of the community’s educational history could be “spoken.”

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe the use of psychoanalytic concepts beyond the consulting room in community settings.
  2. Give 2 examples of psychoanalytically-informed interventions in community settings.
  3. Explain the concept of Psychoanalytic Ethnography.

Presenter
Ricardo Ainslie, PhD holds the M.K. Hage Centennial Professorship in Education at the University of Texas at Austin, teaching in the department of Educational Psychology. He is also the director of the LLILAS-Benson Mexico Center. In addition, he has a private practice in Austin. He was an adjunct faculty member at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies from 1994 to 2011, and founding member and past president of Austin Psychoanalytic. In books, articles, and documentary films, his work ranges from clinical topics to the application of psychoanalytic ideas to socio-cultural issues. Dr. Ainslie has presented his work widely and received numerous awards, including Texas Psychological Association's “Outstanding Contribution to Science Award” in 2002, the American Psychoanalytic Association's “Outstanding Contribution to Psychoanalytic Education Award” in 2004, and the American Psychological Association’s Division of Psychoanalysis Science Award in 2009. His books include No Dancin’ In Anson: An American Story of Race and Social Change (1995), The Psychology of Twinship (1997), Long Dark Road: Bill King and Murder in Jasper, Texas (2004), and The Fight to Save Juárez: Life in the Heart of Mexico’s Drug War (2013).
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Polyamory, Kink, and the Emergence of Wonder Woman: A Discussion of Professor Marston and the Wonder Women With Discussion By Danielle Knafo, PhD & John Beebe, MD

posted Sep 2, 2020, 1:33 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

REDUCED FEE
Film Discussion
Houston Psychoanalytic Society & The Jung Center
Co-Present
Polyamory, Kink, and the Emergence of
Wonder Woman: A Discussion of
Professor Marston and the Wonder Women
With Discussion By
Danielle Knafo, PhD & John Beebe, MD

Sunday, September 13, 2020
4:00PM – 6:00PM CST

Zoom Presentation
*Pre-register for Zoom invitation
Registration Deadline: September 10, 2020

Registration Fee
$25 per person

2 CEUs

In this story, the quest for truth ultimately led to fantasy. Our panel discussion will focus on the film Professor Marston and the Wonder Women, directed by Angela Robinson and released in 2017. (Program attendees should watch the movie prior to the presentation. The film is available for rental from multiple online sources.) The movie is loosely based on the story of William Moulton Marston and his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. In the late 1920s, they were psychology professors and researchers at Harvard University and Radcliffe College, respectively, collaborating on the development of a lie detector test. After William hired student Olive Byrne as his research assistant, the three became involved in a polyamorous relationship and ended up living together for most of the rest of their lives. He brought kink into the threesome's relationship after visiting a lingerie shop in the 1940s, where he was introduced to fetish art-themed comic books and photos. Based on his experiences, he developed the comic book character of Wonder Woman, though the character's sexual imagery dissipated following his death in 1947. Feminist activist Gloria Steinem claimed Wonder Woman as the ultimate symbol of female empowerment, placing her on the cover of Ms. Magazine in 1972. Wonder Woman remains popular to this day.

Marston and his wonder women embodied both creativity and eroticism with passion and a sense of transgression. The discussants will explore these and other themes in the film, including polyamory and kink. We will consider how these phenomena were conceptualized in the early history of psychoanalysis, how they contributed to the character of Wonder Woman, and how they are viewed now. The discussants also will explore the creation, evolution, and cultural symbolism of Wonder Woman - and why she remains such an iconic symbol of feminine strength in contemporary culture.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe how polyamory and kink were viewed in early psychoanalytic theory.
  2. Explain how polyamory and kink are viewed in contemporary psychoanalysis and culture.
  3. Describe 3 symbolic manifestations of Wonder Woman.
  4. Explain Wonder Woman's enduring popularity in current culture.
Discussants
John Beebe, MD is a Jungian analyst and psychiatrist in practice in San Francisco. Active in training and public education at the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco, he was founding editor of its quarterly now called Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche. He became the first American co-editor of the London-based Journal of Analytical Psychology. Among his published books are Integrity in Depth and, with co-author Virginia Apperson, The Presence of the Feminine in Film.  John’s essay, "The Child in 21st Century American Film," can be found in the new book, Cultural Complexes and the Soul of America.
Danielle Knafo, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst in private practice in Manhattan and Great Neck, New York. She is currently a professor in the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program at Long Island University’s C.W. Post campus and faculty and supervisor at NYU’s Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. She has published nine books and dozens of articles on topics including the psychology of art; creativity in psychotherapy; unconscious fantasies; working with trauma, immigration, and psychosis; and the effects of technology on the human psyche and relational life. Her book, The Age of Perversion: Desire and Technology in Psychoanalysis and Culture won the ABPP 2018 best book award. Her most recent book is The New Sexual Landscape and Contemporary Psychoanalysis.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
The Jung Center
5200 Montrose Blvd.
Houston, TX 77006
(713) 524-8253
HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

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