Embodiment in Psychoanalytic Practice

posted Aug 21, 2021, 10:38 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Houston Psychoanalytic Society
Study Group
Embodiment in Psychoanalytic Practice
Facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD
9 Tuesdays
September 28 - November 30, 2021
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Central Time

Live via Zoom
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $270
Friend Members: $330
Student Members: $130
Non-members: $400

13.5 CE/CME/CEUs

This is an intermediate to advanced-level study group for clinicians who want to delve into the topic of embodied approaches to psychoanalytic treatment. The group will provide a historical overview of theoretical concepts of the embodied mind, beginning with Freudian conceptions; subsequently looking at contributions from object relations, infant observations, and neuroscience; and examining current relational perspectives. We will consider how the patient’s and clinician's bodily experience can inform the treatment process. The study group will utilize readings, discussion, and case examples. The group is open to clinicians who have an intermediate grasp of psychoanalytic theory. Registration is limited to a relatively small number of participants in order to allow time for them to grapple with the ideas and explore their own case material with the group. 

OBJECTIVES
  1. Define how Freud postulated an embodied mind.
  2. Describe one enduring contribution and one major limitation of Freud's views of sexuality.
  3. Explain why the advent of object relations theory contributed to a decreased emphasis on embodiment.
  4. Describe how relational perspectives differ from Freud's one-person view of the embodied mind.
  5. Describe how the right brain implicit self lies at the core of psychoanalysis.
  6. Describe how infant observations contributed to the view of an embodied mind.
  7. Describe how attention to bodily rhythms and other verbal phenomena can help to deepen a psychoanalytic treatment.
  8. Describe what is meant by the term "somatic false self."
  9. Describe some forms of unspoken dialogue that might appear in a psychoanalytic treatment.
  10. Explain what is meant by “a field of rhythmic tensions.”
  11. Define embodied setting and symbiotic transference.
  12. Describe how an anorexic client might react to the clinician’s body.
  13. Describe two issues or special challenges in treating someone with a serious illness.
  14. Describe two transference reactions a client might have to a clinician's illness or disability.
  15. Describe some ways that racial issues and attitudes might surface in treatment.
  16. Describe Fanon’s vision of embodied racism.
  17. Identify two alternatives to psychoanalytic approaches to embodied treatment.
  18. Explain when these alternative approaches might be considered to augment psychoanalytic psychotherapies.
Schedule/Syllabus
Session 1, Sept. 28: Reflections on Freudian Views of Embodiment 
Person, E. (2005). As the wheel turns: A centennial reflection on Freud's Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 53: 1257-1282.

Kulish, N. (2019). Reckoning with sexuality. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 100: 1216-1236.

Session 2, Oct. 5: From Object Relations to Relational Views of Embodiment
Fast, I. (1992). The embodied mind: Toward a relational perspective. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 2: 389-409.

Harris, A. (1998). Psychic envelopes and sonorous baths: Siting the body in relational theory and clinical practice. In L. Aron & F. Anderson (1998), Relational perspectives on the body. New York: Routledge, pp. 39-64.
 
Session 3, Oct. 12: Contributions from Neuroscience and Infant Observations       
Schore, A. (2011). The right brain implicit self lies at the core of psychoanalysis. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 21: 75-100.

Beebe, B., Rustin, J., Sorter, D., & Knoblauch, S. (2003). An expanded view of intersubjectivity in infancy and its application to psychoanalysis. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 13: 805-841.

Session 4,Oct. 19: Limitations of Primarily Verbal Approaches to Communication with Clients
Knoblauch, S. (2005). Body rhythms and the unconscious: Toward an expanding of clinical attention. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 15: 807-827.

Goldberg, P. (2004). Fabricated bodies: A model for the somatic false self. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 85: 823-840.

Session 5, Oct. 26: Embodied Communication in Psychoanalytic Treatment
Knoblauch, S. (1997). Beyond the word in psychoanalysis: The unspoken dialogue. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 7: 491-516.

Knoblauch, S. (2017). The fluidity of emotions and clinical vulnerability: A field of rhythmic tensions. Psychoanalytic Perspectives, 14: 283-308.

Session 6, Nov. 2: The Clinician’s Body
Lemma, A. (2017). The body of the analyst and the analytic setting: Reflections on the embodied setting and the symbiotic transference. Minding the body: The body in psychoanalysis and beyond. New York: Routledge, pp.111-127.

Petrucelli, J. (2008). When a body meets a body: The impact of the therapist's body on eating disordered patients. In F. Anderson (Ed.), Bodies in treatment: The unspoken dimension. New York: Routledge, pp. 237-254.

Session 7, Nov. 9: Ill Bodies of Patient and Clinician
McDougall, J. (2000). Theaters of the psyche. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 45:45- 64.

Pizer, B. (1998). Breast cancer in the analyst: Body lessons. In L. Aron & F. Anderson (Eds.), Relational perspectives on the body. New York: Routledge, pp. 191-214.

Session 8, Nov. 16: Racial Embodiment in the Consulting Room  
Leary, K. (1995). "Interpreting in the dark": Race and ethnicity in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 12: 127-140.

Knoblauch, S. (2020). Fanon’s vision of embodied racism for psychoanalytic theory and practice. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 30: 299-316.

Session 9, Nov. 30: Integrated Approaches to Embodied Treatment
Ogden, P. (2015). ‘I can see clearly now the rain has gone’: The role of the body in forecasting the future. In J. Petrucelli (Ed.), Body-states: Interpersonal and relational perspectives on the treatment of eating disorders. New York: Routledge, pp 92-103.

Cornell, W. F. (2016). The analyst’s body at work: Utilizing touch and sensory experience in psychoanalytic psychotherapies. Psychoanalytic Perspectives, 13: 168-185.
Facilitator
The group will be facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD, a psychologist-psychoanalyst who has a private practice in Austin working with children, adults, couples, and consultees. She completed her postgraduate training in adult psychoanalysis at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston, where she currently serves on the faculty. She developed and taught a course there on embodied experience, but this study group will offer some different readings on the topic. JoAnn also completed postgraduate training programs in infant-parent mental health intervention and object relational child, couples, and family therapy. She has presented at national and international psychoanalytic conferences. Her publications include a co-edited book, book chapters, and journal articles about a variety of developmental and clinical topics.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
Houston Psychoanalytic Society is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Houston Psychoanalytic Society maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 13.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters for this educational activity have relevant financial relationship(s)* to disclose with ineligible companies* whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients. 
*Financial relationships are relevant if the educational content an individual can control is related to the business lines or products of the ineligible company.
-Updated July 2021-

Image from CanStock Photo

August Newsletter

posted Aug 21, 2021, 10:32 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Houston Psychoanalytic Society
News & Updates
Message from the President

I am delighted to post my first message as President of Houston Psychoanalytic Society for the 2021-2022 year.

The first of our six conferences, on September 25th, 2021, from 9:00am-3:00pm, is “More than One Can Live: Reconceiving Harm and Reparation in the Intersubjective World” with Jessica Benjamin, Ph.D.

If you join or renew your HPS membership now, you will be able to attend Dr. Benjamin’s conference for free, including free CE/CME/CEU’s! HPS members also receive free registration for our 7 evening speakers and discounted fees for 5 study groups, 9 book club events, and 5 other conferences this year.

I want to draw your attention to the lineup of outstanding HPS Programs for the upcoming year, the theme of which is Evolving Theories, Current Challenges, and Future Directions in Psychoanalytic Practice. Please see JoAnn Ponder, Ph.D.’s News from the Program Chair for our September calendar.

Due to the emergence of a conflict in Mark Solms’ schedule, his August two-day conference on Neuro-psychoanalytic Revisions of Basic Theory and Clinical Technique has been postponed until February.

Additionally, we have seven evening seminars, beginning with Cynthia Chalker, MSS, LCSW, on September 9th, 2021, presenting “Can I Get a Witness? On Being Seen and Heard in a Relational Psychoanalytic Treatment During the COVID-19 Pandemic.” 

Looking for a Study Group? We have four to choose from, ranging from three to nine meetings, on topics from Embodiment to the Analytic Third and more. Feedback on the study groups, introduced last year, is that they provide an invaluable opportunity for in-depth discussion, and application of concepts to case material, amongst colleagues.

New this year is our Book Club! Drop in for the first of nine Thursday evenings, beginning on September 30th, 2021, to hear Chapter Author Deborah Anna Luepnitz, Ph.D., present and discuss “Finding the Piggle: Reconsidering D. W. Winnicott’s Most Famous Child Case.”

In closing, I would like to acknowledge the enormous contributions of time and effort by the entire Board of Directors.
  • Special thanks to JoAnn Ponder, Ph.D., for her ever amazing program development, which makes possible the conferences, study groups, presentations and now a book club we offer.  
  • Warm gratitude to Lisa Miller, M.D., our Past President, for her superb leadership this past year, which has been extra challenging given our quarantine circumstances during her tenure. She took the initiative to almost single handedly get us APA accreditation to serve as a CE provider for psychologists, which was no small feat.
  • Appreciation to Anne Strain, LCSW, our President from 2019-2020. Anne held our organization together, recruiting and mentoring new officers with no previous HPS experience, and took us through the transitions which the pandemic brought.

Please do take a moment join or renew your HPS membership now. You can see the entire selection of HPS Programs for 2021-2022 here.

I look forward to seeing you at HPS Events in the upcoming year!

Warm Regards,
Sharon Chada, Ph.D., President
News from the Program Chair

September Calendar with a Focus on Winnicott’s Contributions

HPS Is Exploring Transitional Space in September!

Sep. 8, 14 & 21 A study group facilitated by Margaret Jordan, PhD, From Transitional Space to the Analytic Third: Developmental and Clinical Implications, will explore Donald Winnicott’s concept of transitional space, its evolution in Thomas Ogden’s potential space and the analytic third, with further elaborations by intersubjective-relational psychoanalysts Jessica Benjamin and Lewis Aron. This study group is highly recommended for those who have little familiarity with these concepts, especially if they plan to attend Benjamin’s conference in that these ideas are foundational to her thinking. The group will be facilitated by Dr. Jordan, an experienced clinician in Houston with a strong interest in Winnicott.

Sep. 9 Our first evening speaker is Cynthia Chalker, MSS, LCSW, presenting Can I Get a Witness? On Being Seen and Heard in a Relational Psychoanalytic Treatment During the COVID-19 Pandemic. She will explore how patients and clinicians were impacted by the pandemic and increased racial violence at this time, in addition to coping with ongoing stresses and life transitions. Cynthia Chalker is a graduate of Manhattan Psychoanalytic Institute and on faculty at Harlem Family Institute, New York, among other affiliations. (JoAnn Ponder has heard this presentation, and found it both engaging and poignant.)

Sep. 25 Our first day-long conference features Jessica Benjamin, PhD, who is on faculty at NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and Stephen A. Mitchell Center for Relational Studies, New York. She has been one of the leaders of the relational movement in psychoanalysis since its inception, contributing original ideas and authoring groundbreaking books and papers. Her article “Beyond Doer and Done To: An Intersubjective View of Thirdness” has been one of the most frequently cited articles on PEP Web for many years. Dr. Benjamin will share her latest ideas with us in her presentation, “More Than One Can Live”: Reconceiving Harm and Reparation in the Intersubjective World. She will note research indicating a process from infancy of rupture and repair which leads to secure attachment. She applies this observation to treatment, reformulating the Kleinian idea of reparation of the internal object and also using intersubjective ideas of repairing rupture and restoring recognition following inevitable enactments. Following her lecture, she will conduct a live consultation with clinical material provided by Tyson Davis, PsyD, a relational psychoanalyst in Austin.

Sep. 28 This is the first meeting of a 9-session study group on Embodiment in Clinical Practice, facilitated by JoAnn Ponder, PhD. Although Freud’s drive theory was rooted in embodied processes, psychoanalysis drifted away from embodied experience with the advent of object relations theory. However, the inseparability of psyche and soma has been affirmed by infant observations, empirical research, and relational theories. This study group will examine the foundational nature of embodied experience and consider how to access and use it in clinical practice. Dr. Ponder is on faculty at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston and has a private practice in Austin. She has developed and taught classes on embodied experience for CFPS and Austin Psychoanalytic. This is a revised syllabus, however, in preparation for an upcoming HPS workshop with Steve Knoblauch and Bill Cornell.

Sep. 30 Our inaugural book club event features Finding the Piggle: Reconsidering D. W. Winnicott’s Most Famous Child Case (2021, Phoenix Publishing House), edited by Corinne Masur. Book chapter author Deborah Anna Luepnitz, PhD will tell us how she happened to meet a therapist in the UK who disclosed that she had been treated by Winnicott as a child. Gabrielle’s description of Winnicott’s work with her revealed how his theories evolved over time. Other chapters reexamine the case from contemporary psychoanalytic frameworks. Dr. Luepnitz is a psychoanalyst in private practice in Philadelphia and a faculty member at the Institute for Relational Psychoanalysis of Philadelphia. (JoAnn Ponder has heard this presentation, and found it fascinating.)  

Happy Exploring!
JoAnn Ponder  
The mission of the Houston Psychoanalytic Society is to promote psychoanalytic and psychodynamic principles and engage the community at large in creative discussions about psychoanalytic thought and application.
The Houston Psychoanalytic Society is a leading source in southeast Texas for continuing education for mental health professionals presented by experts in psychoanalytic research, practice, and application at discounted fees for members. If you are not a member and are interested in joining, or you are a member and would like to become more active, please contact a Board member and join us in our mission!
Visit us online
Be part of the HPS community! Visit our website for the latest member news, events and activities, and to register for all HPS gatherings.
www.houstonpsychoanalytic.org
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Finding the Piggle: Reconsidering D. W. Winnicott’s Most Famous Child Case

posted Aug 21, 2021, 10:26 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Houston Psychoanalytic Society
Book Club Event
New this year, HPS announces its Book of the Month Club! Our first book selection and meeting are as follows.
Finding the Piggle: Reconsidering
D. W. Winnicott’s Most Famous Child Case
edited by Corinne Masur (Phoenix, 2021)
Book Discussion with Chapter Author
Deborah Anna Luepnitz, PhD
Thursday, September 30, 2021
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Central Time

Live via Zoom
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $20
Friend Members: $25
Student Members: $10
Non-members: $30

An American psychoanalyst, Deborah Anna Luepnitz, first came in contact with British psychotherapist, Gabrielle, due to a shared dedication to helping homeless individuals. During their conversation, Gabrielle disclosed that she had been treated by the renowned psychoanalyst, Donald Winnicott, years ago from age 2 to 5 years. In fact, he had fondly nicknamed her “The Piggle.” The treatment, which was documented in a book by that same name published in 1977, had become his most famous child case. Intrigued by this discovery, Luepnitz secured permission to interview Gabrielle about her memories of Winnicott and their interactions. Gabrielle’s recollections also suggested ways that his object relational theories and techniques evolved over those years. Later, Luepnitz’s insights were included as a chapter in a book compiled and edited by her colleague, Corinne Masur, PhD. Other chapters included new details that emerged from archival research and a critical reexamination of this fascinating case study, along with alternative views of the treatment through the lens of contemporary psychoanalytic frameworks.      

Deborah Anna Luepnitz, PhD will provide a 30-minute lecture for Book Club attendees, followed by discussion with the audience.
Guest Author
Deborah Anna Luepnitz, PhD, is a psychologist-psychoanalyst in private practice in Philadelphia and a faculty member at the Institute for Relational Psychoanalysis of Philadelphia. She previously was on faculty at the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine for over 30 years. In 2005, she founded Insight for All, which connects homeless individuals with psychoanalysts willing to work pro bono. Her publications include The Family Interpreted: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Family Therapy (1988) and Schopenhauer’s Porcupines: Five Stories of Psychotherapy (2002), along with contributions to the Cambridge Companion to Lacan. Dr. Luepnitz received the Distinguished Educator Award from the International Forum for Psychoanalytic Education in 2013. 
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
In an effort to reduce administrative costs, HPS will not provide CME/CE/CEUs for Book Club of the Month events. Meeting attendees will receive a certificate of attendance.

"More Than One Can Live”: Reconceiving Harm and Reparation in the Intersubjective World

posted Aug 18, 2021, 8:00 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Houston Psychoanalytic Society
Conference
"More Than One Can Live”:
Reconceiving Harm and Reparation in the Intersubjective World

Presented by Jessica Benjamin, PhD
Saturday, September 25, 2021
9:00 AM – 3:00 PM Central Time
(includes a 15-min break & 45-min. lunch)

5 CE/CME/CEUs

Live via Zoom
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: FREE
Friend Members: FREE
Student Members: FREE
Non-members: $200

The lecture will juxtapose the intrapsychic idea of reparation, based on understanding the unconscious anxieties of harming the love object, with the intersubjective ideas of repairing rupture and restoring recognition. That is, it aims to use and also reformulate the Kleinian idea of reparation of the internal object. Researchers have noted a process beginning in infancy of rupture and repair, generating the experience of a lawful world of secure attachment. Jessica Benjamin calls this the moral Third.

In the absence of intersubjective repair the child may interpret her need for acknowledgment and soothing as destructive (destabilizing) to the needed other. This formulation allows us to see how enactments in the analytic relationship become governed by mutual fear of harming. Fear of harming and being injured drives the doer-done to complementarity involving both partners. Acknowledgment of fears and injury arising in enactment are therapeutically essential and strengthen the moral Third. We also consider the social implications of modifying the doer-done to complementary relation via the experience of two minds recognizing each other.

These ideas will be further explored as Dr. Benjamin conducts a live case consultation with clinical material provided by Tyson Davis, PsyD.  

OBJECTIVES
  1. Identify anxieties related to the belief that one's own needs are destructive.
  2. Describe how emotional safety is influenced by recognition of distress and the dynamic of rupture and repair including therapeutic acknowledgment.
  3. Explain how therapists and patients can extricate themselves from enactments based in dissociation.
Presenters
Jessica Benjamin, PhD is best known as the author of The Bonds of Love (1988), which is translated into many languages, and of “Beyond Doer and Done To: An Intersubjective View of Thirdness” (2004), the basis for her recent book, Beyond Doer and done To: Recognition Theory, Intersubjectivity and the Third (2018). In addition, she is the author of  Like Subjects, Love Objects (1995); and Shadow of the Other (1998). Her article “Beyond Doer and Done To: An Intersubjective View of Thirdness” has been one of the most frequently cited articles on PEP web for many years. She has been one of the leaders in the relational movement in psychoanalysis since its inception. She teaches and supervises at the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis as well as at the Stephen Mitchell Relational Studies Center of which she is a co-founder. She also initiated and participated in a series of workshops for mental health and community professionals in Israel/Palestine called The Acknowledgment Project.
Tyson Davis, Psy.D. is a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst in private practice in Austin, Texas. He operates from a relational psychoanalytic framework. His practice focuses on providing psychoanalytic psychotherapy for individuals, couples therapy, and consultation for clinicians. Dr. Davis completed his doctorate at Biola University and earned a certificate in Adult Psychoanalysis from the Institute of Relational Psychoanalysis of Philadelphia (IRPP). 



REFERENCES
Tronick, E. (1989). Emotions and emotional communication in infants. American Psychologist, 44: 112-119.

Benjamin, J. (2004). Beyond doer and done to: An intersubjective view of Thirdness. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 73: 5-46

Winnicott, D. W. (1971) The use of an object and relating through identification. In Playing and Reality. New York: Penguin.
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276
Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810

Houston Psychoanalytic Society is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Houston Psychoanalytic Society maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Houston Psychoanalytic Society, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters for this educational activity have relevant financial relationship(s)* to disclose with ineligible companies* whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients. 

*Financial relationships are relevant if the educational content an individual can control is related to the business lines or products of the ineligible company.
-Updated July 2021-

Mark Solms, PhD Conference Postponed

posted Jul 27, 2021, 11:29 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Houston
Psychoanalytic
Society
HPS News
Message from the Program Committee Chair

HPS regrets to inform you that the conference with Mark Solms on August 20-21 is being postponed due to unavoidable circumstances. Dr. Solms just informed us of a schedule conflict due to an unanticipated family event. We will let you know as soon as the conference has been rescheduled. We hope that this does not inconvenience you, and thank you for your patience.

Warm Regards,
JoAnn Ponder, PhD, Program Committee Chair
Visit us online
Be part of the HPS community! Visit our website for the latest member news, events and activities, and to register for all HPS gatherings.
www.houstonpsychoanalytic.org

Untitled

posted Jun 29, 2021, 5:33 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Aug 3, 2021, 12:01 PM ]


Can I Get a Witness? On Being Seen and Heard in a Relational Psychoanalytic Treatment  During the COVID-19 Pandemic

posted Jun 29, 2021, 5:31 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Houston Psychoanalytic Society
Evening Speaker Series
Can I Get a Witness? On Being Seen and Heard in a Relational Psychoanalytic Treatment
 During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Presented by Cynthia Chalker, MSS, LCSW
Thursday, September 9, 2021
7:30PM – 9:00PM CST

Live Zoom Presentation
*Pre-registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-Members: $20

CE/CME/CEU (1.5 hrs.) Fees
Active & Student Members: Free
Friend Members: $20
Non-Members: $20

Instructional Level: Intermediate

The cries have been loud and silent. Destruction and Stillness. Most of us had not seen our patients in person for close to a year. The tables were seemingly turned. The ways of being connected to our patients and ourselves had shifted. Who do we “see” in our electronic devices? What do our patients “see” when they encounter us in sessions? What could we not “see” in each other when we sat in the same room? What is the role of Relational Psychoanalysis in helping us “see” a way forward? This paper will consider the uses of Relational Analysis during the COVID-19 pandemic.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Describe the socio-political uprisings in the United States during the lockdown around the country and the compounded collective trauma.
  2. Explain how a combination psychodynamic modalities and Relational Psychoanalytic theory can assist in the formulation of new ways of connectedness between therapist and patient. 
Presenter
Cynthia Chalker, MSS, LCSW is a on faculty at the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California; Faculty and supervising analyst at Harlem Family Institute, (NY). She is a committee member, instructor and mentor in the Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic Teachers Academy of the APA; a visiting instructor at William Alanson White Institute and National Institute for the Psychotherapies. She is on the Board of Directors at Manhattan Institute of Psychoanalysis, from which she is a graduate. She has a private practice in New York, NY.


REFERENCES
Gerald, M. (2020). In the Shadow of Freuds Couch: Portraits of Psychoanalysts in their Offices. P. 23-25. Routledge

Grossmark, R. (2018). The Unobtrusive Relational Analyst: Explorations in Psychoanalytic Companioning. P. 4-25. Routledge.

Locker, B. (2010) 2001 A Spaced Odyssey: Associating and Dissociating with 9/11. Traumatology, 17(3), 35-40. DOI: 10.1177/1534765611421813

Schultz, D. (Producer) 2012. Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years, 1984-1992. (DVD)
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
Houston Psychoanalytic Society is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Houston Psychoanalytic Society maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

From Transitional Space to the Analytic Third

posted Jun 29, 2021, 5:29 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Houston Psychoanalytic Society
Study Group
From Transitional Space to the Analytic Third
Facilitated by Margaret Jordan, PhD
1 Wednesday & 2 Tuesdays
September 8 - 14, 2021
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM CST

Live via Zoom
*Pre-Registration required for Zoom invitation

Registration Fees
Active Members: $90
Friend Members: $105
Student Members: $45
Non-members: $120

4.5 CE/CME/CEUs

Instructional Level: Intermediate

This is a study group for clinicians who want to learn more about the transitional area between fantasy and reality that is initially generated between infant and mother. In the course of normal development, the individual develops the capacity to generate their own potential space. In psychoanalytic practice, it is a co-created realm where the client’s unconscious meets the clinician’s unconscious. The notion of transitional space was originated by Donald Winnicott, elaborated by Thomas Ogden, and further elaborated by intersubjective-relational psychoanalysts. This study group will explore the developmental and clinical applications of these concepts. We will utilize readings, discussion, and case examples. Registration is limited to a relatively small number of participants in order to allow time for them to grapple with the ideas and explore their own case material with the group. The readings will be sent to the group participants.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Define transitional object and its developmental function.
  2. Explain how play in the transitional space might deepen a psychoanalytic treatment.
  3. Describe how potential space contributes to normal and pathological development through the capacities for symbolization and subjectivity.
  4. Explain how projective identification can be viewed as a form of the analytic third.
  5. Explain what is meant by the third-in-the-one and the one-in-the-third.
  6. Explain how the concept of the third is useful in understanding and resolving clinical impasses.
Schedule/Syllabus
Session 1, Sep. 7: Winnicott’s Play in the Transitional Space
Winnicott, D. W. (1953). Transitional objects and transitional phenomena—A study of the first not-me possession. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 34: 89-97.

Winnicott, D. W. (1968). Playing: Its theoretical status in the clinical situation. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 49: 591-599.

Session 2, Sep. 14: From Ogden’s Potential Space to the Analytic Third in Psychoanalytic Practice
Ogden, T. H. (1985). On potential space. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 66: 129-141.

Ogden, T. H. (2004). The analytic third: Implications for psychoanalytic theory and technique.  Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 73: 167-195.

Session 3, Sep. 21: Contemporary Relational-Intersubjective Perspectives
Benjamin, J. (2004). Beyond doer and done to: An intersubjective view of thirdness. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 73: 5-46.

Aron, L. (2006). Analytic impasse and the third: Clinical implications of intersubjectivity theory. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 87: 349-368.


Facilitator
The group will be facilitated by Margaret Jordan, PhD. She is a psychoanalytic psychologist in private practice in Houston, Texas, working with individual adults and couples. She also is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at Baylor College of Medicine. She is a past President of Houston Psychoanalytic Society and has served in a number of other leadership roles for the Society.  
Houston Psychoanalytic Society
1302 Waugh Dr. #276, Houston, TX 77019
(713) 429-5810
Houston Psychoanalytic Society is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Houston Psychoanalytic Society maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, and Houston Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 4.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

HPS, through co-sponsorship with the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, also offers approved CEs for social workers, licensed professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

Newsletter

posted Jun 29, 2021, 5:28 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Houston
Psychoanalytic
Society
HPS News & Updates
Message from the President

As the 2020-2021 HPS year comes to a close, I would like to acknowledge the enormous contributions of time and effort by our HPS Board of Directors. Please give a special thanks to Anne Strain, LCSW, who is leaving the board after completing her term of service as President and Past President. As many of you know, HPS has flourished as a result of Anne’s leadership during a critical time in the history of our community. Special recognition is also owed to Dr. JoAnn Ponder, our President-Elect. JoAnn requested to stay on the Board as Program Chair rather than as President for the upcoming year. JoAnn’s unremitting dedication of countless hours to HPS programming cannot be overstated.

I would also like to acknowledge with gratitude the contributions of our colleagues who attend our programs, making possible the interchange of diverse experiences and expertise so important to our learning community.

Lastly, on behalf of HPS, I want to express our deep appreciation for generous monetary donations to HPS in 2020, and in previous years, by an individual who prefers to remain anonymous. These donations assure our survival, continued growth and outreach efforts, and provision of high-quality programs.

As we approach the new HPS 2021-2022 year, I want to draw your attention to the lineup of outstanding HPS Programs for the upcoming year, the theme of which is “Evolving Theories, Current Challenges, and Future Directions in Psychoanalytic Practice.” Our first conference, on August 20th and 21st, features Dr. Mark Solms, who will be speaking on neuropsychoanalytic revisions of Drive Theory and Ego Psychology, and application of these revisions to clinical practice. Please do take a moment join or renew your HPS membership now.  

I look forward to seeing you at HPS Events in the upcoming year!


Warm Regards,
Lisa Miller, MD, President

To review the lineup of outstanding HPS Programs for the upcoming 2021-2022 year, please click here.
Join/Renew Membership

We are pleased to announce that our first Conference on August 20th - 21st, presented by Dr. Mark Solms, will be included at no cost when renewing or joining the HPS community through membership. Dr. Solms is a world-renowned and incomparably engaging speaker.  

In addition to Dr. Solms' conference, members enjoy a number of other benefits including free attendance at Monthly Evening Speaker Series programs and significant discounts on all other HPS programs. Additionally, HPS is now an approved APA sponsor of CE’s for psychologists.

Read more about membership levels and benefits.
Upcoming Programs

Conference (6 CE/CME/CEUs | 3 per day)
August 20-21, 2021, 10:00am - 1:15pm CST
Neuropsychoanalytic Revisions of Basic Theory
Neuropsychoanalytic Revisions of Clinical Technique
Presented by Mark Solms, PhD

Evening Speaker Series (1.5 CME/CEUs)
September 9, 2021, 7:30pm - 9:00pm CST
Can I Get a Witness? On Being Seen and Heard in a Relational Psychoanalytic Treatment During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Presented by Cynthia Chalker, MSS, LCSW, Psychotherapist-Psychoanalyst

Study Group (4.5 CME/CEUs)
3 Sessions | Sept. 8, 14 & 21, 2021, 7pm-8:30pm
From Transitional Space to the Analytic Third - Developmental and Clinical Implications
Facilitated by Margaret Jordan, PhD
HPS is now an APA-Approved Sponsor of CEs



HPS is now an APA approved sponsor for CEs for psychologists. This applies to programs for the upcoming 2021-2022 programming year.
Meet the Incoming Board of Directors for 2021-2022

Sharon Chada, PhD, President
Cynthia Mulder, LCSW, President-Elect
Bev Bontrager, LCSW, Treasurer
Ann Weiss, LPC, Secretary
Lisa Miller, MD, Past President
Felecia Powell-Williams, EdD, LPC-S, RPT/S, Councilor
Kacie Liput, LCSW, Alternate Councilor
JoAnn Ponder, PhD, Chair of Programming
Elaine Loiselle, PhD, Chair of Marketing
Jessica Spofford, PhD, Chair of Membership

We are so fortunate to have this group of individuals working on behalf of our HPS community!
HPS Community News

Members of the HPS and CFPS (Center for Psychoanalytic Studies) communities volunteered to participate in a monthly lecture series on Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for fourth year medical students at the UT Health Sciences Center in Houston. Dr. Nick Patniyot, faculty at UT, and recent graduate of the Studies in Psychoanalytic Thinking Program, spear-headed this lecture series. The lecturers include Dr. Nick Patniyot, Dr. Lisa Miller, Dr. Lisa Valentine, Dr. Beverly Du, Dr. Chris Fowler, Linda Chase, LCSW, Dr. Shweta Sharma, Dr. Jon Allen, Ann Weiss, LCSW, Dr. Micah Knobles, and Felecia Powell-Willams, EdD, LPC-S, RPT/S.  
Support PsiAN - Please Read!!
Earlier this year, HPS joined the Psychotherapy Action Network (PsiAN) as a Strategic Partner, with representation on its Steering Committee, adding to the roster of organizations, including APsaA, AAPCSW, Division 32, Division 39, psychoanalytic institutes, graduate programs and community mental health agencies, that support PsiAN.  

The PsiAN community is dedicated to promoting psychotherapies of depth, insight, and relationship, and to restoring these therapies to their fundamental place in the mental health landscape through activism, education, publicity, and legislative change. Please click here to read about how PsiAN is working to change the public narrative about psychotherapies of depth, insight, and relationship.

An important action that we can all take to support PsiAN is to join as individual members. I encourage you to join PsiAN by clicking hereMembership is free.

The Group for the Advancement of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis in Psychology (GAPPP) has awarded PsiAN a grant of $75,000, for a total of $100,000, contingent upon PsiAN’s raising $25,000 in matching funds.

Increase the impact of HPS donations with my matching donation of $500! Please click here to make a tax-deductible donation to PsiAN. PsiAN’s sole aim is to advocate for psychotherapists and psychotherapies of depth, insight and relationship. Supporting PsiAN supports us all.

Sincerely,
Lisa Miller, MD, President
The mission of the Houston Psychoanalytic Society is to promote psychoanalytic and psychodynamic principles and engage the community at large in creative discussions about psychoanalytic thought and application.
The Houston Psychoanalytic Society is a leading source in southeast Texas for continuing education for mental health professionals presented by experts in psychoanalytic research, practice, and application at discounted fees for members. If you are not a member and are interested in joining, or you are a member and would like to become more active, please contact a Board member and join us in our mission!
Visit us online
Be part of the HPS community! Visit our website for the latest member news, events and activities, and to register for all HPS gatherings.
www.houstonpsychoanalytic.org

Announcement from HPS President

posted Apr 30, 2021, 7:07 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society

Dear Colleagues,


The Houston Psychoanalytic Society (HPS) has joined the Psychotherapy Action Network (PsiAN) as a Strategic Partner, adding to the roster of organizations, including APsaA, AAPCSW, Division 32, Division 39, and many institutes, graduate programs and community mental health agencies, that have endorsed PsiAN.  


PsiAN  aims to restore psychotherapies of depth, insight, and relationship to their fundamental place in the mental health landscape through outreach, engagement and education, advocacy, and legislative change.   


As president of the Houston Psychoanalytic Society this year, I currently represent HPS on the PsiAN Steering Committee.  My experience thus far with this impressive organization has led me to believe that our ability to expand our active engagement with diverse communities, lawmakers, and institutions on behalf of psychotherapies of depth, insight, and relationship, can also lead to an expanded sense of self and analytic identity.  


I encourage you to think with me on how we (HPS) can be more active within our own greater Houston community in promoting psychotherapies of depth, insight, and relationship, and how we can partner with PsiAN in these and broader endeavors.  However, small actions matter a lot.  An important action that we can all do is support PsiAN by joining PsiAN as individual members.  I encourage each of you to support PsiAN by clicking on the “Join PsiAN” link.   Supporting PsiAN supports us all.  Membership is free, and you can join here: Join PsiAN


Lisa Miller, MD

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